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Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal

Representing the 7th District of Washington

Jayapal Responds to Supreme Court Ruling Allowing Provisions of Muslim Ban to Take Effect

June 26, 2017
Press Release

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal released the following statement in response to the U.S. Supreme Court ruling to allow some provisions of the Muslim Ban to go into effect:

“The Supreme Court has failed to consider the anti-American, discriminatory nature of President Trump’s Muslim Ban – an executive order that remains, in my view, unconstitutional and deeply antithetical to our country’s moral values,” said Rep. Jayapal. “Major courts across the country have already rejected the Muslim Ban, recognizing it as a threat to constitutional protections. In allowing parts of the ban to take hold before considering the case, the Supreme Court has done a grave disservice to core American values.” 

“The delayed decision on the ban’s legality means the Trump administration will be able to infringe on the rights of men, women, and children until the court renders its decision,” Jayapal continued.  “Today’s ruling will have consequences that stretch far and wide: undermining our national security and hurting our economy by restricting tourists, who may have no relationships here, from entering the country.

“Let me be clear – this decision is not a victory for President Trump,” Jayapal added. “The Supreme Court has not given him the green light to unilaterally ban travelers to the United States. In fact, the court makes it clear that Trump cannot restrict many immigrants from seeking a better life in the U.S.”

Background:

The Supreme Court’s decision allows the Muslim Ban to only apply to individuals with no connection to any person or entity in the United States. However, the ban will not apply to individuals with a “bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States.” In other words, individuals with family ties, admission to a U.S. university, employment offer from a U.S. company, or an invitation to address an American audience would be allowed to enter the United States.

Issues: